Nov 5 2015

The Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma 2015 International patient Conference.

pheo nov15

The Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma 2015 International patient Conference.

Webcast free of charge, for anyone interested in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and MEN.

This patient conference is being held in Syracuse, New Jersey on the 5-7 November (the end of this week) and will be Webcast free of charge, for anyone interested in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and MEN.

If interested you can simply register and join us on line, in real time during the event. Details of topics covered and the conference schedule are available on this link  http://www.upstate.edu/cancer/about/conference/schedule.php.

 

(Please note that anyone wishing to register during this last week prior to conference should contact Matt Capogreco the organiser directly, on his email paratroopermatt@gmail.com.

It is a great honor to have Dr. Sipple join us.

A large number of respected physicians including Dr, Karel Pacak of the American National Institute of Health, who is the most published researcher on these rare types of NET, plus Dr. John H. Sipple who was responsible for identifying the association between pheo and thyroid carcinoma which became known as, “Sipple syndrome” and doctors now consider as the key features to both MEN 2A and 2B, will be presenting papers and speaking.

 

The terminology of inherited neuroendocrine tumor (NET) syndromes often seems to be as complex as the tumors themselves.

In fact, the nomenclature for many NET diseases are still confusing to this day due to the number of name changes inherited NET syndromes go through. The combinations of endocrine adenomas, pheochromocytomas, medullary thyroid cancer, mucosal neuromas, and mesodermal dysplasia went by a number of names such as:

  • Multiple endocrine adenomatosis
  • Wermer syndrome
  • Sipple syndrome
  • Pluriglandular syndrome
  • Pluriglandular adenomatosis

 

It wasn’t until 1989 that a consensus was established to use MEN type 1, MEN type 2A, and MEN type 2B.

As doctors achieve a greater understanding of the biology, pathology, and genetics of NET diseases, the terminology evolves and more established consensus guidelines are put in place. However, without the pioneer doctors, who rightfully deserve their names to be recorded in medical history books, we would never gain the better understanding of NET syndromes to improve diagnosis and treatments. Without them, patients would still be waiting for a diagnosis.

 

It is a great honor to have Dr. Sipple join us, and we are very excited to share this opportunity with everyone.

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